Insights

Stanton Chase Joins 'White House Equal Pay Pledge'

Stanton Chase, a global retained executive search firm, joined a host of prestigious U.S. companies in becoming signatories of the White House Equal Pay Pledge.

The White House launched the Equal Pay Pledge in June at the first-ever United State of Women Summit, encouraging companies from across the American economy to take action to advance equal pay.

“It is a distinct pleasure to join more than 100 companies to support this important initiative,” said Mickey Matthews, International Chairman of Stanton Chase and Managing Director of the Baltimore office. “The goals of this program directly align with our global position of working toward a workplace where all genders and ethnic groups can benefit from equal pay. As an organization, Stanton Chase actively educates and places diverse candidates on Board and in Senior and Mid-level positions.”

The White House Equal Pay Pledge follows the trend set by The Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, the first piece of legislation President Obama signed into law. The Pledge states: “Policies that ensure fair pay for all Americans and that help businesses attract the strongest talent can not only narrow the gender pay gap, but also boost productivity and benefit our economy. Yet, the typical woman working full-time all year in the United States only earns 80 percent of what a typical man working full-time all year earns. While the gap has narrowed slightly over the past few years, there is much more work to be done to ensure fair pay for all.”

Building on the Administration’s numerous actions to close the national pay gap, the White House challenged businesses to take the Equal Pay Pledge. Several U.S. private sector companies have come together in support of advancing equal pay.

Stanton Chase, with more than 70 offices in 45 countries, is the only executive search firm to support this initiative. Stanton Chase has long supported gender and ethnic pay equality, a position that is reflected by the activity of its Global Diversity Practice Group. The firm was recently selected for admission into the 30% Club, an international affiliation of businesses that is taking voluntary steps towards the goal of achieving a minimum of 30 percent women on boards.

“The growing complexity of corporate leadership and constantly changing demographics require companies of all sizes to continually analyze the make-up of their executive teams and boards,” said Matthews. “In recommending and placing candidates, Stanton Chase is committed to diversity because it makes sense as we work with our corporate clients to find executives that will lead them into the future. Obviously, equal pay for all genders and ethnic groups is critical in this process.”

The companies joining Stanton Chase as signatories include Adobe, AT&T, eBay, The Estée Lauder Companies, Colgate-US, Mastercard, Yahoo, and Amalgamated Bank. For more information on the White House Equal Pay Pledge, visit this page.

According to information distributed by The White House, these private sector companies and organizations share a commitment to equal pay and their pledges build on the Administration’s record of empowering women and girls.

By signing the Equal Pay Pledge, these employers are:

  • Acknowledging the critical role businesses must play in reducing the national pay gap.
  • Committing to conducting an annual company-wide gender pay analysis across occupations.
  • Reviewing hiring and promotion processes and procedures to reduce unconscious bias and structural barriers.
  • Embedding equal pay efforts into broader enterprise-wide equity initiatives.
  • Pledging to take these steps as well as identify and promote other best practices that will close the national wage gap to ensure fundamental fairness for all workers.

MORE WHITE HOUSE INFORMATION ON PAY EQUALITY

Today, women make up nearly half of the U.S. labor force and more women than ever are the breadwinners in their families. More women are also working in positions and fields that have been traditionally occupied by men. Yet in 2015, the typical woman working full-time all year in the United States earned only 80 percent of what the typical man earned working full-time all year. The pay gap is even greater for African American and Latina women, with African American women earning 63 cents and Latina women earning 54 cents for every dollar earned by a white non-Hispanic man. The gender wage gap continues to be a very real and persistent problem that continues to shortchange American women and their families.

Employers for Pay Equity Business Consortium

This year on Women’s Equality Day, a group of White House Equal Pay Pledge employers formed an independent business consortium, Employers for Pay Equity—to help private industry players share best practices and develop better hiring, promotion, and pay policies. Today, Employers for Pay Equity is announcing a partnership with Simmons College to carry the consortium’s work forward. Simmons College will play a leading role in hosting the consortium to establish pay equity as a best business practice and a means to grow a more equitable workforce for all Americans.