Globalization

TRANSEARCH: Time for a Talent Assessment

Competition for top executive talent is increasing. Organizations are at risk to lose some of their brightest leaders if they have not recently acknowledged their achievements. Global executives who are under pressure to perform would be well served to assess the quality of their team.

 

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Boyden: Key to Leadership

In a recent study Boyden identified key drivers for success amongst Russia’s most successful executives. The study examined four areas of management including: strategic leadership, operational leadership, people leadership and change management.

 

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Boyden: Global Mining: Breaking through the crust to future prosperity

Despite the slow growth in China, the country is still expected to become the world’s largest economy by 2025. China’s size and determination to control more of the production of base metals has led investment in countries such as Peru. In Peru, Chinese backers are behind one third of all Peru’s new mining investments. According to Boyden’s recent report as the growth in China slows, investors, producers, junior miners and service companies are beginning to look to other countries for opportunity. For example, the significant amount of unrealized potential in the African market is capturing global attention.

 

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Spencer Stuart: Dynamic Talent for Dynamic Markets

In a recent report, Spencer Stuart outlines the attributes and additional skills needed for leaders in dynamic markets to truly be effective.  Dynamic market leaders must have cultural agility, handle different kinds of complexities, build local talent pipelines, connect with political and stakeholders, manage regulatory challenges, and have entrepreneurial spirit.

 

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Odgers Berndtson: Will This Fix Your Talent Pipeline

Building a strong talent pipeline is seen as a challenge today, but is nowhere as difficult as it will be with growing markets and shrinking talent pools.  For example, over the next 30 years, it is projected that the EU’s workforce will shrink by 53 million and China’s by 100 million.

 

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Russell Reynolds Associates: Six Dilemmas Facing Multinational Companies in China

When it comes to hiring senior executives in China many MNCs struggle to appoint the best candidate. The growing trend within multinational companies is to appoint local talent, but experienced local talent is hard to find at senior levels. At the same time, expatriates who have strong leadership experience lack market knowledge.

 

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Russell Reynolds Associates: Sea Turtles Who Swim Out Again

Ben Zhai, managing director of Russell Reynolds Associates, was quoted in the Financial Times. In the article, he discusses trends within the Chinese business sector. He notes how western multinationals have begun localizing management, but few have localized decision-making.

 

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Boyden: The Sun Rises on the Indian Executive

The Boyden Report examines emerging markets where revenue is growing fast. In the recent report, Boyden examines the opportunities available in India. India’s GDP jumped 9.4 percent in the 2007 fiscal year—it’s the second fastest growth on record. The growth in the economy is due to an entrepreneurial culture made up of ambitious businessmen and women.

 

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Odgers Berndtson: Are MNCs Taking The Most Intelligent Approach In Asia?

Odgers Berndtson reported economic trends point to a bright future for Multi-National Companies in Asia. Asia, as a region, represents 23% of global revenue and is home to half the world’s population. However, Odgers Berndtson finds that what is being predicted for global companies in Asia is not what is being delivered.

 

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Spencer Stuart: Working for Chinese Enterprises: A Trend for Top Talent?

Multinational corporations during the 1990s and 2000s were the choice for much of Chinese management talent due to the higher compensation, training opportunities and performance oriented culture. Spencer Stuart reports that trend has lost popularity. Overwhelmingly more Chinese executives are leaving multinational companies to join Chinese enterprises.

 

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